Head2Head

“Head2Head Engaged”

EA EA
EA 1 1
EA
FPS 2.9 GB Opt. FPS
Release: 03/22/2011 29.6 sec 30.6 sec Release: 03/22/2011
ESRB: M 0.0% 1.69% ESRB: M

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Head2Head – Crysis 2 Analysis Single Player

We go Head2Head with Crysis 2 for the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3.


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Choose video resolution below. Head2Head – Crysis 2 Analysis MultiPlayer

 

We go Head2Head with Crysis 2 for the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 Multiplayer.


Welcome back for another exciting Head2Head Analysis! This week (thanks to Play-N-Trade Oviedo, FL) we can finally show you our full in depth Analysis of arguably the biggest multiplatform release of all time, and that our friends is Crytek’s Crysis 2 for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360. In this Analysis we take both single player and multi-player game modes in to the fight. Will a winner emerge from this titanic battle? Find out below!


Mouse over the image to see through our “Lens”.

Graphics: Graphically speaking, Crytek delivered the best looking multi-platform title this generation. That being said, coming into this Head2Head we were a bit skeptical – would one version be compromised in the porting process? Fortunately, our skepticism seized immediately after seeing these two beauties running side by side. However there were some slight graphical differences we noticed between the two that should be noted.

First up, the native resolutions of each version of Crysis 2 were a little disappointing at first. Considering both versions fell below the standard HD threshold of 1280×720, this was a bit of a let down, we were hoping for at least 720p. The Xbox 360 version had a native resolution of 1152×720, while the PlayStation 3 version fell just slightly below, sporting a native resolution of 1024×720. A 100 pixel difference with an image below the HD standard was almost impossible to see with the human eye. Oddly enough, we did noticed some textures on the Xbox 360 version looking slightly sharper in some areas, while in other parts of the game, the PlayStation 3 version looked to be better. Either way, texture resolution looked virtually identical when viewed side by side. Moving on to the HDR lighting and procedural destruction.

Mouse over the image to see through our “Lens”.

Crysis 2’s advanced graphics engine utilizes the deferred rendering technique made famous with Sony’s visual juggernaut Killzone 3. This technique allowed Crysis 2 to have some ultra realistic lighting effects that can only be appreciated in real time. The number of individual lights in one scene were almost countless. Good news here is both versions utilized this rendering technique identically. Furthermore, Crysis 2’s HDR lighting is a thing of beauty, for example, light beams from the Sun rays would wrap around the branches of a tree, and individual light beams would penetrate through any hole or opening. Again, both the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 handled volumetric lighting effects identically.

Furthermore, Crysis 2 had also implemented a procedural breaking effect with select objects, like barriers and trees. Objects setup for this feature break and chip away when fired upon, setting the stage for some intense fire fights. For example, if you decide to hide behind a concrete barrier for to long the enemy would deteriorate your cover, forcing you to take cover somewhere else. This effect was identical between consoles.

Another rather neat feature new to Crysis 2 were Deformable objects. Only selected models had this characteristic, and both PS3 and Xbox 360 supported this feature. Deformable objects are basically cloth objects skinned to a type of vertex skeleton. Although the principle is based around cloth physics they obviously don’t act like it. Deformable objects can be used to create deformable metal or other bending materials like a barrel, traffic cones, or drums.

Finally, Crysis 2 also had some great looking water effects to go along with the already superb graphics. When walking through a body of water, the fluid effects would move away from you in a realistic manner. Technically speaking , Crysis 2 had a slew of visual effects which transferred between the two versions nicely. Although SSAO and shadows maps are rendered slightly different, they both achieved their visual goals effectively. On a side note, we noticed after killing an enemy the rag doll physics was disabled and the dead corpse was no longer responsive to bullets and explosions. Maybe this feature was turned off due to region issues. This was apparent on both versions.

Mouse over the image to see through our “Lens”.

Single Player Performance: Performance levels in Crysis 2 were consistent to what was shown in our preliminary frame rate analysis we released earlier this week. As expected, the Xbox 360 had a slight frame rate advantage in chaotic areas, but had some screen tearing to go along with it. The PlayStation 3 version had zero screen tearing throughout. Furthermore, both versions managed to hang around the 30 FPS mark, but both also suffered some performance drops in the heat of battle. So pick your poison, in one hand, there’s a version which has a slight advantage with frame rate. In the other, there’s a version with zero screen tearing. Below are the average frame rate and screen tearing percentages we captured from the game’s single player campaign mode. Now only one question remains, which version performed better during multiplayer? Keep on reading to find out.


PlayStation 3 Frame Analysis  Single Player Xbox 360 3 Frame Analysis Single PLayer
Clip 1 info:
Length of clip: 2567 frames
Average FPS of clip: 28.02
Percent of torn frames: 0.0
Clip 1 info:
Length of clip: 2567 frames
Average FPS of clip: 30.31
Percent of torn frames: 1.67
Clip 2 info:
Length of clip: 9161 frames
Average FPS of clip: 29.41
Percent of torn frames: 0.0
Clip 2 info:
Length of clip: 9161 frames
Average FPS of clip: 29.98
Percent of torn frames: 1.52
Clip 3 info:
Length of clip: 6374 frames
Average FPS of clip: 26.96
Percent of torn frames: 0.0
Clip 3 info:
Length of clip: 6374 frames
Average FPS of clip: 28.48
Percent of torn frames: 0.65
Clip 4 info:
Length of clip: 5318 frames
Average FPS of clip: 25.60
Percent of torn frames: 0.0
Clip 4 info:
Length of clip: 5318 frames
Average FPS of clip: 23.89
Percent of torn frames: 0.26
Clip 5 info:
Length of clip: 9714 frames
Average FPS of clip: 24.75
Percent of torn frames: 0.0
Clip 5 info:
Length of clip: 9714 frames
Average FPS of clip: 24.99
Percent of torn frames: 0.48
Global percent of torn frames: 0.0
Global average FPS: 26.85
Global percent of torn frames: 1.69
Global average FPS: 27.28


Multiplayer Performance: Fortunately, there’s not much to tell here, because the performance levels that we experienced during the game’s single player mode transitioned well over to the game’s multiplayer. The Xbox 360 had a slightly higher frame rate with the occasional screen tear. The PlayStation 3 version had none. Crytek has done a phenomenal job matching up the performance levels between these two gems, locking this category in a tie. Great job Crytek!

PlayStation 3 Frame Analysis  Multiplayer Xbox 360 3 Frame Analysis Multiplayer
Clip 1 info:
Length of clip: 3087  frames
Average FPS of clip: 29.61
Percent of torn frames: 0.0
Clip 1 info:
Length of clip: 3087 frames
Average FPS of clip: 29.94
Percent of torn frames: 1.71
Clip 2 info:
Length of clip: 2152 frames
Average FPS of clip: 27.58
Percent of torn frames: 0.0
Clip 2 info:
Length of clip: 2152 frames
Average FPS of clip: 30.22
Percent of torn frames: 0.90
Clip 3 info:
Length of clip: 8540 frames
Average FPS of clip: 27.88
Percent of torn frames: 0.0
Clip 3 info:
Length of clip: 8540 frames
Average FPS of clip: 29.96
Percent of torn frames: 1.26
Clip 4 info:
Length of clip: 2623 frames
Average FPS of clip: 29.71
Percent of torn frames: 0.0
Clip 4 info:
Length of clip: 2623 frames
Average FPS of clip: 30.72
Percent of torn frames: 0.30
Global percent of torn frames: 0.0
Global average FPS: 28.46
Global percent of torn frames: 2.0
Global average FPS: 30.11


Loading: We must say, loading was a little disappointing on both consoles – but before you get discouraged, an explanation is in order. The first time  you pop your Crysis 2 disc into your system and begin campaign mode you’ll notice that load times before and after missions are well masked behind some dialog and cinematics, and were easily forgotten. Unfortunately, if you quit a mission and decide to resume your current play-through, both games require a hefty load time of around 45 seconds. The good news here is that if you die while playing, the quick-save feature takes a fraction of the time to reload you to your most current checkpoint. Below are our average load times; NOTE: samples 1-3 were captures from quitting and resuming your previous play-through, the rest were quick save restarts. Note: the PlayStation 3 version required a 2 GB mandatory install which took around 6 minutes to complete.

PlayStation 3 Load Times Xbox 360 3 Load Times

Sample 1: 43 seconds

Sample 2: 45 seconds

Sample 3: 41 seconds

Sample 4: 10 seconds

Sample 5: 9 seconds

Sample 1: 41 seconds

Sample 2: 44 seconds

Sample 3: 47 seconds

Sample 4: 12 seconds

Sample 5: 9 seconds

Sample Average: 29.6 seconds
Sample Average: 30.6 seconds


Rollover to see the Difference.  Notice the textures look almost identical.


before
after

Move the Slider to see the Difference.


Rollover to see the Difference.  


before
after

Move the Slider to see the Difference.


Rollover to see the Difference.


Rollover to see the Difference. Can you spot the differences?


before
after

Move the Slider to see the Difference.


Rollover to see the Difference. In this scene the PS3 versions texture mip mapping looks a bit better.


Mouse over the image to see through our “Lens”.

More Roll Overs, Conclusion, Technical Score, Videos and Staff Choice on Page 2. >>

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*To ensure color accuracy from the PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 and Wii U output, the PlayStation 3 has RGB Full Range set to "Full" and Super White "On", and the Xbox 360 has Reference Level set to "Expanded" and HDMI Color Space set to "RGB". Our capture card we have captured segments from the AVS HD 709 . Blu-ray, HD DVD, & MP4 Calibration suite.

As you will see, each system matches each other at the SOURCE LEVEL. No contrast or gamma settings are manipulated before or after capturing our images/videos. We strongly believe that these types of corrections are done on a individuals preference and should not be adjusted by us. Finally, washed out looking images that are due to contrast or gamma differences will not have any influence on our final verdicts. Please Read through our F.A.Q page if you have any questions or concerns.*